Used items

Your safety first: How to handle used or newly bought items

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Cleaning

The first and decisive step for successful reprocessing

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Disinfection

Significant reduction of the microbial contamination

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Inspection

A close look at functionality and efficiency

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Packaging

Only correctly packaged items can maintain their long-term sterility

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Sterilization

The power to reduce germs to their absolute minimum

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Storage

Prolong sterility by optimum conditions

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Definition

[juːst] adjective
All dental items & instruments used during treatment as well as newly purchased items if not pre-sterilized by the manufacturer.

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used_item

Important steps

The pre-disinfection phase of used items is essential to minimise the proliferation of germs, to reduce, as much as possible, the risk of cross-infections for the operator and to ensure the success of the subsequent reprocessing phases.

There are two ways to pre-disinfect used items – related to your local regulations.

  1. Start the pre-disinfection phase directly in the treatment room as soon as tools have been used and quickly move them to the reprocessing room.

  2. Store the tools in a box and quickly transfer them to the reprocessing room to start the procedure.

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01

First step: Information

Check your local regulations regarding the reprocessing of dental instruments as well as the relevant instructions for use.

02

Next step: Pre-disinfection & pre-cleaning

Wipe the entire surface of the instrument or unit with disinfectant to remove any residue and to prevent any settling on the internal parts.

03

Next step: Flushing & soaking

If your local guidelines recommend carrying out pre-cleaning directly in the treatment-area:
Clean the medical device immediately after every treatment to flush out any liquid (e.g. blood, saliva) and to prevent any settling on the internal parts.

04

Next step: Transport

Put all pre-cleaned and pre-disinfected items onto a tray or into a suitable puncture-proof container for safe and prompt transport to the reprocessing room.

05

Important

Note, that the disinfectant used during pre-treatment is only for your personal protection and cannot replace the disinfectant step after cleaning.

Step_02
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Cleaning

W&H Best Practice:

  • For your own safety make sure you wear protective clothing, safety glasses, face masks and gloves (PPE) during treatment and while pre-cleaning any used instruments.
  • Purge handpieces with a flow of water directly at the dental chair and clean the outer surface with a cleaning and disinfectant wipe.
  • Use one wipe per handpiece.
  • Keep the instruments humid to prevent any settling of organic material.
  • Dispose all single-use materials.
  • Immerges all items (in line with manufacturer instructions for use) in a detergent and mild disinfectant solution.
  • Separate burs in order to reprocess them in a specific solution and to avoid losing them.
used_item

Important facts

Handling used/contaminated items poses a high risk of infection, so wearing personal protective equipment is of the utmost importance. Learn more about the risk of cross-contamination and the chain of infection.

Efficient infection prevention is a must

Besides the current risk of Sars-CoV2, there are several other disease-causing microorganisms that can have a major impact on your health and your patient’s health.

Wearing PPE and strictly following the reprocessing process is therefore a must.

For more useful information about protective measures in the dental practice, please click here.

Ways of transmission

The common mechanisms of transmission in healthcare settings, including dental practice, are:

Direct transmission: e.g. direct contact with soil, inoculation into skin or mucosa, droplets
Indirect transmission: e.g. unclean hands and fingers, inoculation by contaminated instruments, sprays, or splashes from e.g. dental aerosols, syringe, fomite borne, airborne

For specific information about aerosols, please click here.

Ready, steady, read!

Always refer to the manufacturer’s instructions for use before starting to reprocess your used items or items you have bought new.

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Definition

[ˈkliː.nɪŋ] noun
Removal of visible dirt, blood, proteins, microorganisms and other debris from dental medical devices or instruments.

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cleaning

Important steps

Proper and accurate cleaning is essential to ensure that all visible dirt is removed from the instruments. It is also crucial for the success of the subsequent phases – disinfection and sterilization above all.

Manual cleaning is performed with the use of a detergent solution and brushes of various sizes.

All items must be completely dried after cleaning. Brushes must be disinfected/sterilized at least daily.

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01

First step: Dismantling

If possible, dismantle the medical device according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

02

Next step: Rinsing

Rinse each instrument carefully under running water (<36°C/96.8°F to avoid protein coagulation).
Make sure all surfaces and recesses are exposed to water by rotating the instrument/item.

03

Next step: Cleaning

Clean the instrument/the parts with an appropriate cleaning agent. Rinse carefully after cleaning.

04

Next step: Drying

Air dry or hand dry using a clean, disposable, non-linting cloth.

05

Important

For successful disinfection, it is essential to dry the instrument/the parts after cleaning. For further information, please click here.

Step_03
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Disinfection

W&H Best Practice:

  • In terms of efficiency and safety, always favour an automatic cleaning method.
  • Always wear PPE and punctured proof, heat-resistant gloves.
  • Make sure that the tools to be cleaned are compatible, (according to the manufacturer's instructions), with the chosen cleaning method.
  • Cleaning is ideally carried out using a validated cleaning process, e.g. a washer or thermal washer disinfector (TWD).
    If this is not available, batch records should be kept indicating who was responsible for cleaning the devices.

Ultrasonic cleaning allows thorough and accurate cleaning of even the most difficult to reach parts of the medical devices (e.g., knurling, hinges, handle). Handpieces must not be reprocessed in ultrasonic baths.

The cleaning solution must be changed in regular intervals, at least daily. All items must be completely dry after cleaning.

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01

First step: Dismantling

Dismantle the instrument according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

02

Next step

Carry out the ultrasonic cleaning by following the manufacturer’s instructions.

NB: Don’t forget to change the solution regularly (at least once a day).

03

Next step: Drying

Air dry or hand dry using a clean, disposable, non-linting cloth.

04

Important

For successful disinfection, it is essential to dry the instrument/the parts after cleaning.
For further information, please click here.

Step_03
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Disinfection

W&H Best Practice:

  • In terms of efficiency and safety always favour an automatic cleaning method.

  • Always wear PPE and punctured proof, heat resistant gloves.

  • Make sure that the tools to be cleaned are compatible, (according to the manufacturer's instructions), with the chosen cleaning method.

  • Cleaning is ideally carried out using a validated cleaning process, e.g. a washer or thermal washer disinfector (TWD).
    If this is not available, batch records should be kept indicating who was responsible for cleaning the devices.

Automatic cleaning ensures high quality, repeatable and consistent results and full traceability. It drastically reduces the risk of injury to the user.

All items must be completely dry after cleaning.

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01

First step: Dismantling

Dismantle the instrument according to the manufacturer’s instructions.

02

Next step

Follow the user instructions for the related cleaning or reprocessing unit.

03

Next step

Load the cleaning unit or TWD accordingly to the instructions for use.

04

Important

For successful disinfection, it is essential to dry the instrument/the parts after cleaning.For further information, please click here.

Step_03
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Disinfection

W&H Best Practice:

  • In terms of efficiency and safety always favour an automatic cleaning method.

  • Always wear PPE and punctured proof, heat resistant gloves.

  • Make sure that the tools to be cleaned are compatible, (according to the manufacturer's instructions), with the chosen cleaning method.

  • Cleaning is ideally carried out using a validated cleaning process, e.g. a washer or thermal washer disinfector (TWD).
    If this is not available, batch records should be kept indicating who was responsible for cleaning the devices.

cleaning

Important facts

Cleaning is the most crucial step in the reprocessing process. Learn here about the basic principle and other facts.

Sinner’s Circle – The basic principle of cleaning

Whether it is performed automatically or manually, effective cleaning needs water – and four main physical factors that affect each other:

  1. Time (exposure time of the other three factors)
  2. Chemical (usually a cleaning solution)
  3. Mechanical power (e.g. scrubbing to remove visible dirt or to establish contact with the cleaning solution)
  4. Temperature (affects, for example, the effectiveness of the cleaning solution)

Proportions of the factors can be altered but at the end must make up a complete pie. More about Sinners’s Cycle: The history of Sinner’s Circle

Legal advice

The reference standards for cleaning are EN ISO 15883-1 and EN ISO 15883-5. “A clean medical device can be defined as visually free of soil and quantified as below specified levels of analytes.” (extract)

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Definition

[ˌdɪsɪnˈfekʃən] noun
Disinfection results in a reduction of the number of viable micro-organisms on a product or instrument to a level that has been specified beforehand. This level corresponds to the intended further handling or use of the product.

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disinfection

Important steps

The disinfection phase is essential to consistently reduce the bacterial load, as well as any risks of cross-infection, and to favour the subsequent sterilization phase.

Treat the external surface of handpieces with a disinfectant-soaked wipe. Dip instruments that are not handpieces in a disinfection tank, ensuring all instruments are completely soaked and arranged so that their surfaces are in direct contact with the disinfectant solution.

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01

First step: Checking

Ensure that cleaning has been carried out effectively and that the medical device is completely dry internally and externally. Any moisture can reduce the impact of the disinfectant.

02

Next step: Reading

Check the related instructions for use of both the disinfectant and the instrument/device to make sure that they are compatible.
See also: EN ISO 17664

03

Next step: Wiping

Wipe down with disinfectant. Make sure that the entire surface of the instrument/device has been covered by the disinfectant. Please observe the action time of the disinfectant.

04

Start with Inspection

Scroll down to next step.

05

Important

Please always observe the specific manufacturer’s information with regard to whether chemical disinfection processes are compatible with the instrument: EN ISO 17664.

06

Next step: Check dryness

Ensure that cleaning has been carried out effectively and that the medical device is completely dry internally and externally. Any moisture can reduce the impact of the disinfectant.

07

Next step: Instructions for use

Check the related instructions for use of both the disinfectant and the instrument/device to make sure that they are compatible.
See also: EN ISO 17664

08

Next step: Immersion

Follow the instructions for use to ensure the disinfection bath is carried out as specified. The instruments and/or medical products must be fully immersed in the liquid disinfectant.

09

Next step: Rinsing

Abundantly rinse with tap followed by demineralized water. The quality of water used should be appropriate to the clinical procedures to be undertaken. Water deionizing devices such as Multidem provide suitable water quality.

10

Next step: Drying

Fully remove any water residues, especially inside lumens (hinges, pipes), using filtered gentle compressed air and non-woven disposable tissues.

11

Start with Inspection

Scroll down to next step.

Step_04
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Inspection

W&H Best Practice:

  • Use a thermal washer disinfector with an automatic drying function.
  • Always ensure that the instruments can be reprocessed in a thermal washer disinfector according to the manufacturer's instructions for use.
  • Always ensure that the instruments are loaded in the correct way and that the appropriate washing program has been selected.

A single, repeatable and validated process that, together with the disinfection of instruments, ensures a high standard of cleaning. This minimizes the possibility of injuries and cross-infections to users.

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01

First step: Treatment area

Immediately after use instruments must be pre-cleaned to ensure that organic material will not dry on.

02

Next step: Transport

If pre-cleaning is not carried out in the treatment area, instruments shall be placed in a suitable covered puncture-proof container and shall kept moist to prevent drying of any liquid (blood, saliva).

03

Next Step: Reprocessing room

Dismantle the instruments according to the manufacturer’s instructions for use.

04

Next Step: Washing & disinfection

Follow the related instructions for use of the TWD as well as the instruments to ensure the procedure is carried out successfully. Please be aware that instruments might require special maintenance following the thermal washer disinfection process.

05

Start with Inspection

Scroll down to next step

Step_04
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Inspection

W&H Best Practice:

  • Use a thermal washer disinfector with an automatic drying function.
  • Always ensure that the instruments can be reprocessed in a thermal washer disinfector according to the manufacturer's instructions for use.
  • Always ensure that the instruments are loaded in the correct way and that the appropriate washing program has been selected.
disinfection

Important facts

The purpose of disinfection is to reduce disease-causing germs in such a way that any potential infection chain can be broken, and the germ count is kept as low as possible.

Chemical disinfection

Chemical disinfectants contain active substances that kill germs. Among other things, this effect is based on the chemical disinfectant’s ability to destroy the microbial cell wall, or to inhibit certain metabolic processes of the germs resulting in cell death.

Chemical disinfectants for dental practices

Dental practices must use disinfectants that have a suitable range of action (bacteria, fungi, viruses). There are specific tests that disinfectants must meet in order to make claims of disinfectant activity against specific pathogens (EN 1276 and EN 13704).

Note that even if a product or active substance has been tested successfully for the whole spectrum of disinfectant activities, including sporicidal activity, it cannot be regarded as a sterilant.

Legal advice

The reference standards for thermal disinfection are (EN ISO 15883-1 and EN ISO 15883-6. ). ‘Disinfection results in a reduction of the number of viable micro-organisms on a product or instrument to a level that has been specified beforehand. This level corresponds to the intended further handling or use of the product.’ (extract)

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Definition

[ɪnˈspekʃən] noun
Inspection is the generic term for the inspection, maintenance and testing of all cleaned and disinfected dental items.

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inspection

Important steps

A careful inspection, maintenance, and testing of all cleaned and disinfected items gives proof of their functionality and guarantees a long service life. Moreover, the risk of infection – both for you and for your patients – is minimised thanks to the identification of damaged or soiled items.

Inspect all items

  • For any visible soil such as blood or dental cements.
  • For any remaining drops of liquid, which can cause corrosion.
  • In case of wet items: dry immediately to avoid new contamination
  • For all items that are not completely clean: go back to the start.

Inspection and maintenance must be carried out in the reprocessing area only. Use a proper oil to lubricate hinged and rotary instruments.

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01

First step: Inspection

Inspect all items for any visible soil such as blood or dental cements as well as for any remaining drops of liquid, which can cause corrosion. For all items that are not completely clean: go back to the start. (Yes, it is a bit like a board game).

02

Next step: Quick drying

Devices that are still damp or wet must be dried quickly using a lint free cloth. Any instruments with cavities must be dried quickly using compressed air. Timing is everything, because only quick drying helps to prevent any new contamination.

03

Next step: Reassemble

Reassemble multipart instruments to ensure all parts are complete and present. Please always check that the individual parts have matching serial numbers.

04

Next step: Maintenance

Maintain all items according to the manufacturer’s advice. For turbines, contra-angles, handpieces and couplings, now is the time to carry out a complete, quick and reliable maintenance of the inner parts, e.g. with the help of our Assistina devices.

For the maintenance of jointed instruments, such as scissors, W&H recommends using F1 Service Oil.

05

Next step: Storage or use

Check the Spaulding Classification to make sure that you are on the right track.

Sterilizable devices
Non sterilizable devices

For sterilizable devices and instruments please take a look at the next step.

Step_05
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Packaging

W&H Best Practice:

Use an automated device to lubricate turbines, contra-angles, handpieces and couplings. Make sure all items are completely clean and dry before maintaining.

  • For optimum conditions, use an LED-illuminated magnifying glass.
  • Use proven processes and automatic devices to lubricate instruments after each cleaning to ensure longer service life.
inspection

Important facts

The cleaning, disinfection, drying, and function of instruments must be checked carefully. Any deposits such as lime-scale or organic matter such as blood and proteins can impair the sterilization and cause further risks of infection.

Instruments and devices that are damaged or corroded also pose a risk of infection for both you and your patients.

Only a dried item is a good item

It is of the utmost importance that all items are dried after cleaning and disinfection. Moisture and heat promote the growth and replication of micro-organisms. So instruments for immediate use that are temporarily stored wet become contaminated again. Dryness is also a must prior to packaging and sterilization.

Packaged and sterilized instruments that have not been dried could compromise sterilization. Wet packages are not compatible with sterile storage.

Maintain the maintenance

The product lifetime and the medical device’s ability to operate correctly are mainly determined by mechanical stress during use and chemical influences due to processing.

Maintaining the products after cleaning, disinfection, and drying is therefore an essential part of quality management and the reprocessing process.

Please refer to the related instructions for use to ensure adequate maintenance.

Handpieces in particular need regular lubrication.

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Definition

[ˈpækɪʤɪŋ] noun
Preparation and packaging of sterilizable items before sterilization.

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packaging

Important steps

Packaging system’s goal is to ensure long-term and full sterility at the point of use of the items. The packaging must consist of a microbial barrier and protective packaging.

Use bleached crêpe paper or wraps combining cellulose and synthetic fibres. They are permeable to steam, air and chemical vapours and provide an effective barrier when packs are stored in clean and dry conditions.

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01

First step: Inspection

Ensure that inspection has been carried out effectively so that all components of the item in question are dry and free of any soil and/or damage.

02

Next step: Information

Follow the specific technical instructions of your packaging material.

When using paper-like materials, either an envelope or parcel packing procedure should be used.

03

Next step: Avoid tension

Make sure the sterilization package is large enough for the items for sterilization. The filled sterilization package must not be under tension.

04

Next step: Sealing

Seal package with a heat resistant, markable adhesive tape.

05

Next step: Labelling

Follow the instructions for use provided by the manufacturer of your sterilizer regarding labelling. If labelling is recommended before sterilization put the label sticker that have you already prepared on the package. Do not write directly on the packaging material. For full traceability W&H recommends noting the following information:

  • The product name/contents of the packaging (if not visible)
  • The name of the person who releases the batch
  • The estimated expiry and/or sterilization date
  • Any sequential numbering for identification (in the event that identification is requested)
06

Next step: Sterilization

The packaged items are now ready for the sterilization process.

07

Start with sterilization

Scroll down to next step.

Next step in the AIMS cycle

Sterilization

W&H Best Practice:

  • Use a sealing device and sterilization rolls to preserve long-term sterility of items.
  • Ensure pouches are not too small (tight) or too large.
  • Ensure pouches are 3 fingers (or 30%) larger than instruments to avoid damage or poor drying during sterilization.

Cassettes and containers consist of re-usable receptacles intended for sterilization. These methods are suitable for repeated use and optimisation of loading and storage.

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01

First step: Inspection

Ensure that inspection has been carried out effectively so that all components of the item in question are dry and free of any soil and/or damage.

02

Next step: Avoid tension

Make sure you have chosen the right size pouch. Pouches should not be too small (tight) or too large as they could be either damaged or cut, or not dried properly. W&H recommends using pouches that are 3 fingers larger (or 30% larger) than the instruments.

03

Next step: Sealing

Follow the specific instructions for use of the packaging, sealing and documenting unit.

04

Next step: Sterilization

The wrapped items are now ready for the sterilization process.

05

Start with Sterilization

Scroll down to next .

Next step in the AIMS cycle

Sterilization

W&H Best Practice:

  • Use a sealing device and sterilization rolls to preserve long-term sterility of items.
  • Ensure pouches are not too small (tight) or too large.
  • Ensure pouches are 3 fingers (or 30%) larger than instruments to avoid damage or poor drying during sterilization.
packaging

Important facts

Only perfectly sealed pouches will preserve the sterility of their contents. Labelling makes it possible to link instruments to their sterilization cycle and patient file.
The reference standard for packaging is EN ISO 11607.

Sealing is important!

Packaging with automatic sealing guarantees long-term sterility and automated documentation.

Where items are packaged manually, please pay special attention to the sealing process. Only items that are completely packaged and correctly sealed guarantee sterility after sterilization.

Labelling ensures traceability

Labelling packages is part of the traceability procedure. It will make it possible to link instruments to their sterilization cycle and to the patient's records. The label should identify the sterilizer, the type, and number of the sterilization cycle, the person in charge, the sterilization date and, potentially, the expiry date of the load.

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Definition

[sterəlaɪˈzeɪʃn] noun
Set of methods and means used to eliminate all living micro-organisms in any form including spores.

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sterilization

Important steps

Sterilization guarantees the elimination of germs, including spores that cause infection. All instruments must be sterilized to ensure they are sterile at the point of use.

The reference standards for steam sterilizers are:
EN 13060 defines requirements for the manufacture of small steam sterilizers. According to this standard, sterilizers are divided into 3 types:

  • Type B, intended for the sterilization of all types of loads, such as porous, solid and hollow instruments both wrapped and double-wrapped
  • Type N sterilizers, intended for the sterilization of non-wrapped solid products
  • Type S sterilizers, intended for the sterilization of products specified by the manufacturer of the sterilizer

EN 285 defines requirements for the manufacturer of big steam sterilizers
ANSI/AAMI ST55 that is the North American standard for steam sterilization. According to this standard, sterilizers are divided into 2 types: gravity displacement and dynamic air removal.

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01

First step: Inspection

For all instruments, make sure functionality has been checked and any maintenance has been carried out correctly. Pouches should be 3 fingers (or 30%) longer and larger than the instrument(s).

02

Important

In order to optimise drying, place all pouches paper side up or down according to the sterilizer manufacturer’s recommendations. All W&H sterilizers require paper side up.

03

Next step: Avoid overloading

Follow the sterilizer IFU regarding the tray/chamber loading method. Overlapping of pouches could impede drying. Do not exceed the maximum number/mass of instruments that can be processed by the selected cycle.

04

Next step: Information

Select a cycle designed and validated for the type of instruments to be processed.

05

Important

B-type cycles are compatible with all load types that are single or double pouched.

06

Next step: Check dryness

Upon completion of the cycle, check the integrity and dryness of each package. The paper side must be absolutely dry. If not, instruments cannot be released as sterile. Instead they must be unpacked and returned to step 1 ‘used items’.

07

Next step: Link to patient file

W&H offers a safe and practical system for linking instruments and sterilization cycles to the patient records – the W&H Lisa Safe Label printer.

The label printer connects directly to any W&H sterilizers that allow label printing only if the sterilization cycle was completed successfully.

08

Proceed to storage

Scroll down to next step.

Step_07
Next step in the AIMS cycle

Storage

W&H Best Practice:

  • Select type B cycles according to EN 13060 or dynamic air removal sterilizers according to ANSI/AAMI ST55.
  • Visually check the load at the end of the sterilization cycle to evaluate the integrity and drying of the wrapped items. Please note, that only perfectly dried, and intact packs can be stored.
  • Adopt a traceability procedure to link sterilization cycle, load and patient by providing tangible proof that items were sterilized. Thanks to EliTrace, the advanced traceability feature offered by Lisa, it is even possible to trace back to the individual instrument and/or kit without any extra software or a computer.
  • Place all pouches paper side up or down according to the sterilizer manufacturer’s recommendations in order to optimise drying. Do not overlap pouches or exceed the maximum number/mass of instruments that can be processed by the selected cycle.
  • Integrate a water treatment system to prolong the service life not only of your sterilizer but also of your instruments.
  • Carry out periodical tests such as leakage (vacuum), Helix, Bowie & Dick tests and checking loads according to your local regulation guidelines.
sterilization

Important facts

The purpose of continual germ reduction at each stage of the reprocessing procedure, right through to sterile reusable products, is to reduce the microbial population to the Sterility Assurance Level of 10-6, i.e. a 6 log reduction. In other words, to achieve a probability of 1 non-sterile item in a million.

Steam sterilization

Extended steam sterilization is currently the only recommended method to minimize the risk of prion transmission through surgical instruments. Due to the principle of thermal denaturation, steam sterilization is also effective against drug-resistant bacteria.

Quality first – including, where Water is concerned

Steam sterilizers require the use of good quality demineralized water. This will prolong the lifespan not only of your sterilizer, but also of your instruments. Poor quality water (hardness, chlorine) leads to damage, stains and corrosion to both your sterilizer and your instruments.

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Definition

[ˈstɔ:rɪʤ] noun
The action or method of storing and preserving sterilized packaged instruments as well as disinfected non-packaged instruments.

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storage

Important steps

Choosing the correct storage location ensures the maintenance of sterile conditions. Keep packed items in dry and dust-free conditions so that they are ready and safe for usage at all times.

Sterile goods must be stored in a dry, dust-free environment. Following the “First in – first out” – concept makes regular checks easier: Store freshly sterilized packaged instruments at the back of the shelves, so that packaged instruments towards the front that were sterilized at an earlier date will be used next. So, the first in will also be the first out.

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01

First step: Inspection

Ensure that the packaging of the sterilized goods is dry. If there are any pouches that are wet or damp, they are not considered sterile and are not suitable for storage as wrapped sterilized items. Instead they must be unpacked and returned to step 1 ‘used items’. See also ‘Wet and moist packaging after sterilization’

02

Next step: Labelling

Items that are not already labelled must be labelled now, documenting that the sterilization process has been executed successfully.
The label must include the date of sterilization, the person in charge for releasing the load and the expiry date, if available.

03

Next step: Transport

Make sure that the sterile devices are transported in a manner that will not compromise their status. Transport should be carried out quickly.

04

Next step: Storage

Store the sterilized items according to your individual storage system.

05

Next step: Regular checking

Check the status of stored items at regular intervals. As soon as there are any signs of damage the items can no longer be regarded as sterile.

06

You completed the AIMS workflow

and your instruments are now ready for reuse.

W&H Best Practice:

  • Ensure sterile items are transported in a manner that does not compromise their status. Transport should be carried out quickly.
  • Refer to the technical instructions of your packaging manufacturer and local guidelines concerning the expiry date.
  • Check the status of stored items at regular intervals. As soon as there are any signs of damage, the items can no longer be regarded as sterile.
storage

Important facts

The loss of sterility essentially depends on the external influences present during storage, handling, and transportation. When it comes to determining the possible storage duration, the storage conditions themselves are crucial.

Ideal conditions for safe storage of sterilized items

Sterile goods must be stored in a dry, dust-free environment.

  • The storage area should be clean, regularly maintained and separated from non-sterilized products.
  • The shelf life of the sterile goods depends on the storage conditions and the packaging used.

Storage/transport of disinfected items and non-wrapped sterilized items

Disinfected items and non-wrapped sterilized items for immediate use must be transported aseptically.

  • Do not place them near the chair, as they may become contaminated by non-sterilized items.
  • Do not place them near sinks or in other humid conditions.
  • Ensure that they are not touched by or do not come into contact with items that have already been used.

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